resources for new breeders? - Talk Parrotlets Forums



User Menu
Forum Home
Parrotlet Gallery
Today's Posts
Log In
Register now!
Search



Advanced Search
Forums
Parrotlet Talk

Parrotlet Housing

Do It Yourself

Parrotlet Pictures

Your Parrotlet's Health

Parrotlet Diet

Training and Bonding

Parrotlet Breeding

Parrotlet Articles

Parrotlet Rainbow Bridge

Parrotlet Vet Listing

Chit Chat

Site Discussion

Talk Network
Talk Budgies
Talk Cockatiels
Talk Parrotlets
Talk Parrots

Go Back   Talk Parrotlets Forums > Parrotlets > Parrotlet Breeding

Notices

Parrotlet Breeding If you're interested in breeding your parrotlets, this is the place for you!

resources for new breeders?

This thread has 21 replies and has been viewed 9194 times.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-25-2011, 12:14 PM   #1
derrp
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 48

Parrotlets Owned: 3+
Experience: Parrotlet Lover

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 7
derrp is on a distinguished road

resources for new breeders?

So, our parrotlets Yoshi and Fiona had their first clutch and six of the seven eggs have hatched. They are doing a great job taking care of the babies & we have started taking the older babies out for socializing sessions (we're co-parenting). My question is, can anyone recommend a good resource for guidelines/tips on raising parrotlet babies? I've read quite a bit about psittacine development but I don't feel like I have enough parrotlet-specific information. My specific concern is socialization and making sure the babies have the experiences they need to develop into healthy, friendly, confident adults.

Any suggestions are welcome!
__________________

Kiki ('09 white/blue F)
Yoshi ('08 green M) & Fiona ('09 green F)
June 2011 clutch = 3 green M, 1 green F, 1 yellow F
January 2012 clutch = 2 green M, 1 yellow M, 1 yellow F
derrp is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-25-2011, 01:47 PM   #2
Callie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 1,382

Parrotlets Owned: 2
Experience: Parrotlet Owner

Karma: 246
Rep Power: 12
Callie has a spectacular aura aboutCallie has a spectacular aura aboutCallie has a spectacular aura about

In my own personal opinion, co-parenting is the way to do it, but not all parrotlet parents have the personalities or temperaments to allow this to happen. You are actually your own best resource as you get to know your parent birds and how they react to "sharing" their babies with you occasionally. If they seem OK with it, you've won their trust and that's the biggest obstacle.

One member here had good success socializing just one baby at a time. That way, you've not threatened the entire family and the parents will also see that you return the precious little one unharmed.

Sounds like what you are doing is working for you so if it ain't broke, I wouldn't be looking to fix it!
__________________
~Callie~
There are no bad birds, just misunderstood ones.
Callie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 05:18 PM   #3
dmurcar
Junior Member
 
dmurcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Central Florida, closer to the Gulf Coast
Posts: 16

Parrotlets Owned: 8
Experience: Parrotlet Owner

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 0
dmurcar is on a distinguished road

Send a message via Skype™ to dmurcar
Okay, I have read that it is best to limit the number of chicks that the parents feed at one time to 4. This is my first experience with breeding of any type of bird. The mother laid 7 eggs and to date 5 of the seven have hatched. I was preparing a brooding area that I may relocate the 2 oldest of the clutch to begin hand feeding. Especially since I want very tame and friendly pets. Now I am thinking I don't need to do this? I can handle them from the nest box and return to their parents.
dmurcar is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 06-25-2011, 06:05 PM   #4
derrp
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 48

Parrotlets Owned: 3+
Experience: Parrotlet Lover

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 7
derrp is on a distinguished road

The father is tame, and the mother is not. They screech at us when we come over to the cage but we've taken babies out many times now and I do think that the mother trusts us because we've shown her that we always return the babies unharmed.

My main concern with these babies is proper socialization and environmental exposure. For example, with our human-bonded p'let Kiki, it took us over a year before we worked out a system where she felt comfortable bathing herself, and she still won't play with her toys. I suspect that the reason for this is that she wasn't exposed to these things early on. I want these babies to have proper, thorough socialization and environmental exposure so that they don't experience the same difficulties Kiki does.

My current plan is to take the babies in their travel cage to the local park a few times a week so that they can be outside and see/hear all the adults, kids and dogs. We have barbecues at our place with lots of adults that will play with them. I plan on providing lots of toys and bathing opportunities. But I'm worried I'm going to miss something big. For example, I just read about touch massage and accustoming the birds to having toenail clippers touch their feet... if I hadn't read about it through my own online search, I might not have thought about it. And the babies are only babies once so if you miss the window of opportunity you've done them a disservice.

Maybe I'm just worrying about it too much?
__________________

Kiki ('09 white/blue F)
Yoshi ('08 green M) & Fiona ('09 green F)
June 2011 clutch = 3 green M, 1 green F, 1 yellow F
January 2012 clutch = 2 green M, 1 yellow M, 1 yellow F
derrp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 06:06 PM   #5
Callie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 1,382

Parrotlets Owned: 2
Experience: Parrotlet Owner

Karma: 246
Rep Power: 12
Callie has a spectacular aura aboutCallie has a spectacular aura aboutCallie has a spectacular aura about

How many chicks a pair can take care of is dependent strictly on each individual pair. I mainly breed lovebirds and don't like to see more than 4 in each nest, but I've had hens raise 6 quite nicely and all survived. Are the remaining eggs fertile?

Get to know your own pair.
__________________
~Callie~
There are no bad birds, just misunderstood ones.
Callie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 06:12 PM   #6
Callie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 1,382

Parrotlets Owned: 2
Experience: Parrotlet Owner

Karma: 246
Rep Power: 12
Callie has a spectacular aura aboutCallie has a spectacular aura aboutCallie has a spectacular aura about

Quote:
Maybe I'm just worrying about it too much?
In my humble opinion, yes.

I've had my parrotlets for probably more than a yr., and I've never had to clip their nails. If they have proper perches, this isn't necessary. Provide toys in their cage when they are young, give them bathing opportunities and offer a variety of food and you will find that they pick up rather quickly.

Not all parrots enjoy being handled by numerous humans. To some, it can be quite upsetting. I have 2 that are extremely friendly, but not with strangers.
__________________
~Callie~
There are no bad birds, just misunderstood ones.
Callie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 06:39 PM   #7
derrp
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 48

Parrotlets Owned: 3+
Experience: Parrotlet Lover

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 7
derrp is on a distinguished road

Thanks for the thoughtful responses y'all. Callie, I've never had to trim Kiki's nails either (she has a million different perches and spends a lot of time outside on real branches to boot) but when I read that I thought, "what else am I missing because I'm inexperienced?" Maybe I would feel better if I had a reference book or something
__________________

Kiki ('09 white/blue F)
Yoshi ('08 green M) & Fiona ('09 green F)
June 2011 clutch = 3 green M, 1 green F, 1 yellow F
January 2012 clutch = 2 green M, 1 yellow M, 1 yellow F
derrp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2011, 03:03 PM   #8
bakewell
Senior Member
 
bakewell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 379

Experience: Parrotlet Breeder

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 7
bakewell is on a distinguished road

Tha parrotlet handbook is a great book!!! I have both versions the one by Sandee Molenda is more hand raising/taming based. I personally wouldnt stress too much and stress your babies out by taking to a park. not all parrotlets will like dogs LOL! sounds like your doing ok as you are hun. As for the nail clipping Ive never had to do it to any of my birds. Luckily!
__________________
bakewell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 06:56 AM   #9
derrp
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 48

Parrotlets Owned: 3+
Experience: Parrotlet Lover

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 7
derrp is on a distinguished road

I have been thinking about getting Sandee's book. I also found this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Manual-Parrot-...=cm_cr_pr_pb_t

which is a textbook but looks nothing if not comprehensive. Anyone else have this one?
__________________

Kiki ('09 white/blue F)
Yoshi ('08 green M) & Fiona ('09 green F)
June 2011 clutch = 3 green M, 1 green F, 1 yellow F
January 2012 clutch = 2 green M, 1 yellow M, 1 yellow F
derrp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 08:57 AM   #10
derrp
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 48

Parrotlets Owned: 3+
Experience: Parrotlet Lover

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 7
derrp is on a distinguished road

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmurcar View Post
Okay, I have read that it is best to limit the number of chicks that the parents feed at one time to 4. This is my first experience with breeding of any type of bird. The mother laid 7 eggs and to date 5 of the seven have hatched. I was preparing a brooding area that I may relocate the 2 oldest of the clutch to begin hand feeding. Especially since I want very tame and friendly pets. Now I am thinking I don't need to do this? I can handle them from the nest box and return to their parents.
I am certainly no expert, but I think that like others here have said, whether or not you can successfully co-parent depends on the parent birds' temperaments (especially the hen) and your relationship with them.

As I said in an earlier post our male is tame and the hen is not, and we've had good success so far taking out a couple of babies at a time & returning them. When we first started doing it I was a little apprehensive because I had read that sometimes psittacines will attack/neglect chicks that have been removed from the nest. The parents screech like crazy at us when we approach their cage but we just block off the entrance to the nestbox with a folded magazine, remove a couple of the older babies, and go to another room to snuggle them. The hen goes back into the box and they quiet down right away. Then when we go to put the babies back we get the screeching routine again... but she always calms right down when she goes into the nestbox, and the babies are all fat and healthy. So, it's working for us.

I would have thought judging from the screeching routine that we were taking a bit of a risk taking the babies out, but it's turned out really well for us & I do think that the hen knows now that we will return her babies unharmed (and in short order - we don't keep them out for more than 5-10min at this point since they're still under two weeks old and can't regulate their body temperature whatsoever).

I am of the opinion that removing the babies altogether and hand feeding exclusively isn't an ideal situation for anyone - babies, parents, humans. For the babies, there is no way humans can adequately replicate the level of care and attention they normally get from their parents... the hen is in the nest box 99% of the time and always preening, feeding, and snuggling with them. No way can hand-feeding come close to that level of care. For the parents, it's probably a bit traumatic to all of a sudden have their babies *poof* gone. For the humans, exclusive hand-feeding is a LOT of work and can be risky, especially for first-timers (aspiration, non-ideal timing of feedings, etc.).

So, co-parenting seems like a great, balanced approach. But I don't think there's a big enough body of evidence yet to say that it's better overall for the health & well-being of the babies.

Just my thoughts.
__________________

Kiki ('09 white/blue F)
Yoshi ('08 green M) & Fiona ('09 green F)
June 2011 clutch = 3 green M, 1 green F, 1 yellow F
January 2012 clutch = 2 green M, 1 yellow M, 1 yellow F
derrp is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


REMEMBER TO VOTE FOR US DAILY!

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:34 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 2006 - , 2403 Networks LLC, All rights reserved.