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Go Back   Talk Parrotlets Forums > Parrotlets > Your Parrotlet's Health > Parrotlet Diet

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Parrotlet Diet Discuss the diets of parrotlets here. Recipes can go here too.

What's Your Nutrition??

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Old 02-27-2008, 01:45 PM   #11
Wilder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pado View Post
Harrison's recommend only Pellets and a little vegetable - Besides being boring this just doesn't sit well with me and I wouldn't consider this.
This comment of Pado's has me thinking of something that's not related to nutrition, necessarily, but with psychological enrichment of the birds we're feeding. We're told to do things like provide a large home, lots of interaction, and plenty of toys that are rotated and changed out often so our birds don't become bored and start doing things such as screaming and feather plucking.

If this is true of something like toys, how can it be so much different with food? I know countless birds eat a pellet diet and don't pluck or scream, but would they perhaps be happier with a wider variety of different shapes, colours, and textures in their diet? We would get bored eating the same meal every day, so why do we expect intelligent creatures like parrots to be perfectly happy doing so?

I have to say, this has been an interesting series of discussions so far, and certainly a thought-provoking one!
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Old 02-27-2008, 02:34 PM   #12
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It makes perfect sense to me - Parrots don't just eat one thing in the wild. At different times of the year different foods and fruits are in season and the bird has variety. I did read an article once that said when a favorite fruit or farmers crop (nuts etc) is in season the birds will eat mostly that single food until its gone - they will snack on other items available in their home range but will concentrate mainly on the item in season - visiting the site many times per day - but those items constantly change.
As you mentioned with toys and cage size - I'm sure food variety as a lot to do with keeping our companion Parrots happy and stimulated. There is an array of things to keep them happy and content and it only makes sense that food would be one of those things.
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Old 02-27-2008, 06:38 PM   #13
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Here's Kiwi's Nutrition

He mostly gets all his foods from www.parrotsontheporch.com But with the mix of the Small Parrot Blend... he gets a regular mix bought from Walmart (parakeet blend) --I pick all the safflowers, sunflowers, and pellets out of it.

Including this, we cook up BeakAppetit and cut up fresh foods--and sometimes cook up some beans. We get some fresh nuts from time to time as well.
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Last edited by Kumiko; 09-07-2008 at 05:34 PM.. Reason: I've changed Kiwi's diet quite a bit.
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Old 02-27-2008, 06:52 PM   #14
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Sounds to me as if Kiwi is eating like a King - I must commend you, I don't know too many teenagers would would be so committed to their bird
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Old 02-27-2008, 11:43 PM   #15
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Vets are really interesting sometimes with what they say about dog diets also. I have a vet that knows nutrition, but most say Science Diet, ha. They sell it. So, I listen to what they say and read and feed a great diet to both pets, I homecook for both.

Balance and variety.
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Old 02-28-2008, 01:24 AM   #16
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I have to agree with Pado. Parrots are very visual birds and Sadie is always tasting everything with her little tongue. Plus, I believe that getting them accustomed to as many different foods as possible means they will be less fussy eaters overall.
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Old 03-01-2008, 07:52 PM   #17
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I posted a thread about our diet some time ago:

http://www.talkparrotlets.com/showth...sai+birds+diet

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaFahy View Post
This is the basic diet used for our personal flock and the adoption flock, let me know about any questions or if you'd like additional info. Our diet recommendations do change periodically as our research develops in avian nutrition and health. I will try to keep this thread current.


At Partners for Parrots we believe in a very natural diet. There is not enough, if any, solid research on parrot diet in the wild, thus I don't feel any "perfect" formulated diet could possibly meet the needs of our birds b/c we don't thoroughly know their needs! So we aim to provide different nutrients, supplements and a huge variety. You don't aim for a daily balance necesarrily, but an overall balance.


My percentages are just an approximate guide

Soaked then cooked:
(40%) vegetables
(30%) grains, seeds
(15%) beans
(10%) fruits
(5%) other - nuts, supplements, etc.


Vegetables
Be respectful of seasonal and organic and local AS OFTEN as possible. We usually try for five or more per week, chopped and ready to use each morning. For two little birds just buy the smallest ones possible and eat it yourself too!! Some examples to follow:

Collard
Jalapeno
Mustard
Kale
Dandelion
Cilantro
Carrot tops
Endive
Escarole
Turnip greens
Water cress
Romaine
Bok Choy
Lettuce mix
Broccoli
Cabbage
Brussel sprouts
Zucchini
Chayote squash
Snap peas
Cucumber
Kohlrabi
Green beans
Carrots
Squash
Sweet Potato
Pumpkin
Parsnip
Beets
Jicama
Celery
Corn
Chili pepper
Red pepper
Cauliflower
Potato (limited)
Radish
Tomato
Green pepper
Asparagus

Grains and Seeds
Organic. Currently using the following:
millet
oats
barley
red lentils
quinoa
brown rice
parrot seed mix
sesame seeds
Lots of other choices though, this is just what I have been able to get so far (I buy 25# at a time for our flocks and our customers)

Legumes / Beans
Organic or natural
Currently using a "13 bean soup mix"

Fruits
Again, seasonal, local and organic as often as possible. Just 2-3 in the daily meal.
Papaya
Mango
Cantelope
Apricot
Peach
Oranges
Apples
Banana
Mango
Papaya
Cranberry
Blueberry
Raspberry
Strawberry
Grapes
Cherries (pitted)
Dried fruit (unsulfured)
Lemon
Kiwi
Pineapple
Melons
Pears
Blackberry
Peaches
Passion Fruit

Other: Additions & Supplements
Nuts (no peanuts)
apple cider vinegar
dende oil
flax seed
ground eggshell (washed and baked first)
organic pellets, Harrison's or Totally Organics

We do not utilize animal proteins but acheive protein through feeding the beans/legumes. Dr. Wolf from the avian section of the University of Hanover and a nutrition expert for parrots strongly advises against feeding any animal proteins to parrots. They increase the uric acid and will lead to gout. They do not need it nutritionally and it can harm them.

The hardest part of this is just STARTING the routine. Once you start it's no big deal. And the birds LOVE to be a part of food prep

We use the apple cider vinegar in a spray bottle to put a light spray on the morning meal, this has excellent anti-bacterial properties.

If you make a big batch, you can freeze individual portions into ice cube trays to defrost per morning. This is a cool way to do it, prepare a big batch and not have to worry about it for a while. I prefer to make enough for about three, maybe four days. I much prefer to feed fresh over frozen and have not done this ever.

It is ideal to feed a quantity / volume that your bird will actually finish, but any extras are fed to either the outside birds and squirells at the shop or at home to our domestic flock of chickens and geese.

The neat part about the grains and beans and some of the seeds is that I can feed the Partners for Parrots adoptive flock these from our supporting shop, Bonsai Birds
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Old 03-01-2008, 11:07 PM   #18
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I feed my two parrotlets Harrison's organic pellets, an organic seed mix, healthy bird muffins, lots of green veggies, peppers, carrots, and the occasional snack of birdie popcorn or millet during training sessions.

Not that it's a gauruntee but I like using organic foods (like organic pellets) because I know most likely they won't put artifical chemicals/ingredients into their mixes. I've noticed that a lot of the usual brands that most large pet stores sell are willing to use these sorts of chemical preservatives.
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Last edited by hollybean; 08-12-2011 at 12:37 PM..
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Old 04-11-2008, 12:47 AM   #19
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For those who like to feed cooked foods such as Beak Appetite here is a Canadian Company that has a similar product. Not sure if they ship outside Canada though. Click
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:52 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilder View Post
This comment of Pado's has me thinking of something that's not related to nutrition, necessarily, but with psychological enrichment of the birds we're feeding. We're told to do things like provide a large home, lots of interaction, and plenty of toys that are rotated and changed out often so our birds don't become bored and start doing things such as screaming and feather plucking.

If this is true of something like toys, how can it be so much different with food? I know countless birds eat a pellet diet and don't pluck or scream, but would they perhaps be happier with a wider variety of different shapes, colours, and textures in their diet? We would get bored eating the same meal every day, so why do we expect intelligent creatures like parrots to be perfectly happy doing so?
Yes, indeed I believe it to be true. Birds in the wild spend a lot of their time looking for food and feeding on various kinds of food. It does seem very deprived to stick a boring bowl of pellets in front of them (I know I wouldn't like a similar processed food diet!), no matter how good the pellets are. Now, I think a good home-made diet is superior to pellets anyway - check out Feeding Feathers Yahoo forum for great diet advice (and I followed FF's feeding guidelines for years and recommended them before I became a moderator there). For people who can't or won't offer a varied, nutritious home-made diet, pellets are the fall-back.
Reta
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