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Handling Adult Parrotlets

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Old 08-09-2014, 05:04 PM   #1
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Handling Adult Parrotlets

I was wondering what experienced Parrotlet owners felt about this article and of the handling of adult Parrotlets.

http://forums.avianavenue.com/index....aviors.116564/

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Old 08-09-2014, 08:02 PM   #2
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I would disagree. Indi is the perfect example. She was never handled as a baby (so parent raised and left in a cage with her siblings), but wasn't "afraid" of hands. So by this person's terminology, she would be considered a "wild" parrotlet. When I got her, she new nothing and she was 7 months old. Within a month of working with her, she was tamed. I would say tame because she would step up willingly, fly to me, let me give scritches and do tricks. She was very interactive and wouldn't just "sit there".
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:27 PM   #3
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I don't know about the wild side, but on the "tame" side I disagree that all tame ones will instantly explore a new person when they are young. People forget that there are a million things to be scared of as a parrotlet, and something as simple as the wrong color shirt could cause utter panic. Most birds need a period of adjustment, even the fully hand-tamed ones (which Tumi definitely was), and to expect them to explore and be unafraid is to not understand what the world looks like when you weigh 28 grams.
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:06 AM   #4
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I had an untamed female parrotlet given to me, still young. At first she was very terrified of everything. In a matter of days I saw a change. She acted as though she wanted out of the cage to see more of me. When I let her out, she was still very skitterish, but was coming along nicely. I couldn't pet her, she was too bitey. Sorry to say I didn't have her long enough to tame her.
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Old 08-10-2014, 01:20 PM   #5
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Also I think that the writer stated she had 5 or six so she was probably not giving anyone of them the amount of time needed to socialize them. I really don't think tame and wild are the correct nomenclature as it is more socialization. I think if she had one or two and spend time with them equally she probably would have had more success in the socialization process.
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Old 08-15-2014, 05:01 AM   #6
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Completely disagree with her. I have multiple birds, some I got as newly weaned babies, one I've raised from egg and one that was rescue. They each have their own personality and with that personality comes different types of behaviors which have absolutely nothing to do with their being tame or wild. While environment and socialization do play a role, it's not the only factor.

Take human children for instance. Would you say that one of them is "wild" simply because they prefer quieter activities and don't scream and run around all day? No, you would encourage them to be more outgoing but accept that their personality is that of a more quiet individual. Why should it be so different with birds? I tend to do a lot of comparisons to that of a small child, but parrots have the intelligence of a kindergartner so why not?

As with humans, anyone or any bird can be raised in such a way that they receive the correct social stimulation but once exposed to a negative they can and will become withdrawn often requiring additional intervention. Then you have those who are more outgoing, constantly getting into messes requiring that you reign them in a bit.

The problem with birds though is that novice owners tend to think you can treat them like a cat or dog by leaving them home alone all day, come home, take them for walk, give them a few scratches behind the ears and they will remain content. You can literally go months without seeing your dog and when that dog sees you it will be all forgiving, jumping all over you. They have the capacity to bond with multiple people, but birds...they tend to be more choosy, picking one or two favorites, requiring toys for stimulation and lots of frequent contact with their favorite human. Granted their are exceptions and some birds are just social and go to anyone, but as general rule I've found that they tend to be a bit more choosy when it comes to who they interact with. I'm member of multiple online bird groups and I am constantly getting private messages or emails asking how I achieved the level of tameness that I have with my flock. The only answer that I can give is that I spend a hell of a lot of time with them and I do mean A LOT! I am extremely fortunate to be in a position where I can do so, but honestly that's the only thing i'm doing that perhaps someone else isn't. I read "expert" articles that state you should spend xx amount of time with your bird...usually 20-30 min at a time, once or twice a day but I've always disagreed with that. If you want an exceptionally tame bird then your going to have to get that bird to trust you. Trust means spending time with it, while remain calm and being patient while you wait for him/her to give you indication that they are ready for more. IDK..I'm not an expert, i'm just a pet bird owner and new hobby breeder. What I do know is this....My birds are seriously spoiled and I can't leave the room without them flying after me, that's how attached they are. So yea, IMO if you want a tame bird, spend time with it...lots and lots of time because you get what you put into it.

Ugh...........sorry for the soapbox...but I actually got 2 emails today about this very thing. One of them wants "instant" results...wanna guess what I told them ? The other is inexperienced, somewhat scared of the bird but is willing to learn. I'll try to help that person, the other one...I can only hope for the best for that little guy when it gets rehomed and it will, trust me.
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Old 08-15-2014, 11:12 AM   #7
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I agree about the time spent. I have spent more time with Chili than I have with any other pet at one time. I am fortunate in that way also. He spends pretty much ever waking hour out of his cage with me except for a trip to the store or if I am cooking. I believe this has settled him (finally). When he first came he was very bitey and scared.

I am going to add this and I really do think this is a big thing. Confidence in ones self to gentle an animal gets further than someone who doesn't have this. This is learned of course from experience. I felt I could gentle this bird because I have trained many many dogs. I understand and can execute, desired behavior equals reward, training. I didn't know exactly how far he would go but I knew I could teach him to step up and be with me. Being petted was a different matter, I didn't know if physically this would be pleasing to him. He went through a phase where he started biting again and we just stuck with it. But it did hurt!!!

For all that rambling I'll go back to my point that knowing and having the confidence you can do something helps tremendously in accomplishing it and not everyone has had that experience so it's harder I am sure. A confident person who is given the steps will be more successful than a person who feels stressed and unsure.

My personal opinion is, with birds, it's probably not a good idea to start out with 2 together to try to bond with them but getting one at a time then letting them be together is the better option. Especially for someone who has never had them before.

It's 11:10 am do you know where your bird is? I do and he's still asleep!!! Lazy birdie!
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Old 09-28-2014, 04:05 PM   #8
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I am sure glad she put this disclaimer " this is just my experience and opinion on the matter" at the end . It sounded to me like her needing an excuse for her problems, and thought that "wild" and "tame" P,lets could be it ?
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Old 09-28-2014, 07:12 PM   #9
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I believe there are a lot more factors that come in to play other than just 'tame' or 'wild.' The individual parrots personalty plays a huge part...some are just plain nastier than others, some are naturally sweet. All have at least some level of attitude, when you get down to it. lol

Take my friend and I, we both just got a brother and sister. She took the boy, I took the girl. Both raised exactly the same, being co parented [rather than hand raised]. They weren't handled a super lot towards the end. Mine was stepping up by the next day, scritches by the third. My friend isn't having the same sort of luck, hers is much more skittish and afraid. He's drawn blood and is just now, barely taking millet from the hand.

Parrotlets are a sassy little parrot...what some may see as 'aggression,' really probably is just their little spit fire personality. Mine is sweet, but she's still sassy...I have been bit, she tests me all the time and then hour later, be curled up in a ball in my hand, enjoying some good scritches. Some of it is how I handle it, some others may get bit more by how they handle it...to own a parrot, you must know what you are doing, have a certain confidence and aura about you. If you don't, they know it and will work you to their advantage.

If you want to get 'technical,' they are all wild, parrots aren't domesticated like our dogs/cats. The poster's article really makes no sense to me for this reason. One of the most common things I hear with parrot ownership is, if you can't take a bite, don't get one...it's true, I've yet to own or meet ONE parrot that hasn't nailed me, whether just a little nip to a deep wound that left that pretty scar behind. Little secret people don't realize when they see that awesome, talking and kissing parrot on youtube...that took work, time and yes, bites/nips to get to that point [and let's face it, even the most well behaved parrot has their bad days and can bite out of the blue...may not be common, but def not unheard of].
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Old 12-09-2015, 01:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M'éanín's Mommy View Post
Completely disagree with her. I have multiple birds, some I got as newly weaned babies, one I've raised from egg and one that was rescue. They each have their own personality and with that personality comes different types of behaviors which have absolutely nothing to do with their being tame or wild. While environment and socialization do play a role, it's not the only factor.
I have dealt with many birds of all types and mammals.
They all have personalities and seem to always make sure no hard and fast rules apply to all critters.
One CAN often "tame" a bird with a lot of work and sometimes very little work, but the bird's personality makes a huge difference.
I personally find smarter species easier to tame, but they can also be stubborn and fixed in their ways.
Just like me.

I am just learning about parrotlets and still not clear about their personality traits.
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